The Spitis’ herd consists mostly on Holsteins with some Jerseys and crossbreds. The farm has been in the family since 1973, boasting up to four generations on the farm.  
PHOTO SUBMITTED
The Spitis’ herd consists mostly on Holsteins with some Jerseys and crossbreds. The farm has been in the family since 1973, boasting up to four generations on the farm. PHOTO SUBMITTED
    IVAIPORÃ, PARANÁ, BRAZIL – Milking is Aliny Spiti’s life through and through.
    “Being in the middle of the cows, taking care of each one of them is a love,” Aliny said. “Seeing the fruit of my work and getting results is very rewarding.”
    Aliny Spiti milks 42 cows with her parents, Antonio and Marli Spiti, and brother, Elinton Spiti, with Elinton’s wife, Alana Andrade, in Ivaiporã, Paraná, Brazil. Their farm, Sítio Boa Esperança, has been in the family since 1973, boasting four generations on the farm with an area of 521 acres.  
    Morning milking starts at 6:30 with breakfast to follow.
    “I grew up watching my father do this, and I want to pass this love on to my future children,” Aliny said.
    After breakfasting with her parents, Aliny cleans the cow feed lane. By noon, the cows are fed a fresh batch of feed. Around 4:30 p.m. Aliny starts the afternoon milking.
    “On the weekends, I take time off with the family and my fiancé, Alessandro Hillman,” Aliny said.
    The milking cows are housed in a compost barn and milked in a 4 Point Swing Over Parlor. The cows average about 60 pounds of milk per day off a predominately corn silage diet.
    Aliny’s main responsibilities on the farm consist of milking the cows, administering medicines and vaccines, and managing reproduction.
    “My herd is all derived from artificial insemination,” Aliny said.
    In Brazil, there are 1.3 million dairy farmers milking 23 million cows, according to Balde Branco magazine. The Spitis’ region, located in the southern part of Brazil, has about 10 dairy farms.
    Although Aliny’s farm is surrounded by only a few other dairy farmers, the infrastructure supports the dairy well.
    “Our equipment supplier and milking maintenance is Delaval,” Aliny said. “We have a facility for maintenance and assistance.”
    The dairywoman sees her country as a suitable place to dairy farm.
    “In my opinion, Brazil is favorable for the production of milk,” Aliny said. “Even a small farm can produce [a lot of] milk.”
    The climate in Aliny’s region is subtropical, allowing most farmers to grow soybeans, corn, beans, coffee, wheat and oats. Warm temperatures and ample rain help these crops grow, which in turn provide feedstuffs for the dairy animals.
    “If we can’t produce food for the cows, it limits the production of milk,” Aliny said.
    The Spitis income is entirely dairy based as the family breeds for milk marketing and production.
    “Milk is my monthly sustenance,” Aliny said. “I cannot complain. If today I have a comfortable life, that is through milk.”
    The Spitis milk is all marketed to KOLLAC dairy where it processed and sold as pasteurized milk, cheese and yogurt.
    “The average price of milk for producers is $16.28/cwt,” Aliny said.
    The biggest challenge and concern facing the Spitis’ dairy farm is mastitis.
    “Today, with the compost system, it has minimized a lot, but I still have to live with it,” Aliny said.
    In the industry as a whole, Aliny sees the greatest challenge being able to produce milk at an efficient cost of production.
    “Milk, despite being an incredible food, is undervalued; there is a high production cost and low marketing price,” Aliny said.
    Looking towards the immediate future, Aliny wants to double production and reach 5,000 pounds per day with 60 animals.
    “In the long run, the sky is the limit,” Aliny said. “I work with a lot of love and dedication. My cows will always be my priority.”