As per usual, the beginnings of this song parody of an old Willie Nelson and Julio Iglesias duet came to me after a long day of feeding men during corn silage harvest. Roughly 12 men for each of the three meals; give or take a few if we weren’t pumping manure. I can’t explain why it popped in my head. Perhaps it was because I was in the quiet steam of the shower and my brain was on autopilot. After a good run of feeding guys for four days of prime chopping weather they asked me if they should get pizza for lunch the next day. Before I could answer, Peter interjected that I truly do enjoy feeding them, and pizza would hurt my feelings. It is a challenge when you have cows that need your attention, and have to deliver tangled twins that set you back an hour on lunch delivery—but, I love it. Cora helps now, and the guys are so sweet to her, thank both of us for our work, and offer compliments. What more can anyone ask for?

To all the men I’ve fed before
Who travelled in and out the door
I’m glad they came along
I dedicate this song
To all the men I’ve fed before

To all the men I once impressed
And may I say I’ve tried my best
For helping me to grow
I owe a lot I know
To all the men I’ve fed before

The crops on farms are always growing
And every time I try new things
The crops on farms continue growing
Who knows what the next crop brings

To all the men who made my day
While chopping corn or chopping hay
I’m glad they came along
I dedicate this song
To all the men I’ve fed before

To all the men who critiqued me
Who offered thoughts and praise you see
They’re written in my book
I often take a look
At all the men I’ve fed before

The crops on farms are always growing
And every time I try new things
The crops on farms continue growing
Who knows what the next crop brings

To all the men I’ve fed before
Who travelled in and out the door
I’m glad they came along
I dedicate this song
To all the men I’ve fed before
    Jacqui and her family milk 800 cows and run 1,200 acres of crops in the northeastern corner of Vernon County, Wis. Her children, Ira (12), Dane (10), Henry (5) and Cora (toddler), help her on the farm while her husband, Keith, works on a grain farm. If she’s not in the barn, she’s probably in the kitchen, trailing after little ones, or sharing her passion of reading with someone. Her life is best described as organized chaos – and if it wasn’t, she’d be bored.